Attention: Waffle House or Hashbrowns: It’s the right thing to do

It came to my attention when we visited our very first Waffle House that they really didn’t know how to make good hashbrowns. This is a common problem for restaurants, and I thought it might be an issue for the average family that might read our blog as well. Hashbrowns are not difficult to make and can be a flavorful addition to you breakfast meal. Here’s how it’s done.

First, preferably the day before you plan to ingest delicious hashbrowns, you should bake up a couple of potatoes. I did mine in the oven, but go ahead and use the microwave if it makes you happy. This will feed around 6 people or 4 people who will eat all the hashbrowns that are there, which is us. You’ll need about 1 medium potato per person. I baked all these up because they were getting sprouty.
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After they have baked, let them cool and put them in the fridge. This will make them easier to grate up the next day and will let them dry out some.

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Day of hashbrown deliciousness, take your potatoes out of the fridge and grate them with your brand new awesome KitchenAid box grater that just replaced your 13 year old Walmart special or whatever grater you have. If you have one of those fancy mandolin things with a grater attachment, you can use that, or your food processor, whatever.

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You’ll have some skins left over when you’re done grating if you do it this way, that’s fine. Don’t injure your hand trying to grate it all the way. Potatoes are cheap, hands are not.

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Here’s what you’re going to end up with, a big pile of grated potatoes. Now, you need to chop up some onion. With this much potatoes, I used half a medium onion. If you don’t like onion much, just use a few slices. If you really like onions, use more. Even if you don’t like onions, though, add just a little bit. Trust me, it’s important.

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I chopped my onions up pretty fine. If you like onions, you could make them a little bigger. I like to have them blend in, though, then the kiddos don’t tell me about what is in their food (“Mom, there’s [insert undesirable food] in here!” or “What are those [insert color of food] things?”) although mine have decided they like onion. It was like a gift from God.

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Now grab a skillet or griddle. I grabbed my cast iron. Cast iron was made for hashbrowns, so if you have one, let it fulfill it’s destiny. Otherwise, work with what you’ve got, they’ll still be tasty just not as beautifully crispy and golden brown. If hashbrowns are really important to you, though, there’s still time to ask for one of these babies for Christmas. It won’t let you down.

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Now, you’re going to add an obsene amount of oil and butter. I probably added 2 Tbsp oil and 4 Tbsp butter, to start. You can add all butter. I wouldn’t add only oil. You could. But I wouldn’t.

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Add your onions and potatoes to the pan. This is really too many for this pan, but this is my largest cast iron, so I made it work. It will just require more flipping. If you have one of those big griddles, though, you could spread it out nice and thin. It will take less time that way and make for more browning. I like to add the onions first because they need to cook more than the already cooked potatoes. Also, add a whole bunch of salt and pepper. Like the butter, add more than you think you’ll need.

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When you flip, you’ll need to add a little more butter or oil if your pan or grill is getting dry. The potatoes absorb a lot of the oil, so you’ll need to add. as I said before, an obsene amount. It’s OK. Hashbrowns are a sometimes food. We don’t eat like this everyday, but once in a while, it’s OK. You also need to add some more salt and pepper when you do this first flip.

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Here, they are getting a nice brown crust on more of the hashbrowns.

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And once most of the potatoes have browned some, they’re done.

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I served ours with sausage, eggs, and clemetines. It was a great brunch/lunch after a busy morning of Christmas decorating.

What’s your favorite breakfast food?

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Amie

About Amie

Hi! I'm Amie. Bryan's wife. Joyful mother to three. Homeschool teacher. Seamstress. Kitchen experimenter. Trying to figure out this thing of being a disciple of Christ.
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